Monthly Archives: July 2017

Free book for everyone…

Box of booksFREE BOOK FOR EVERYONE 

Yesterday I gave away a paperback copy of ‘Just As You Are: Buddhism for Foolish Beings’. Today I am giving away twenty boxes – or however many you want – through the magic of electricity & the World Wide Web.

You can download your free copy until the end of Thursday: 
Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2ut1V6B
Amazon US: http://amzn.to/2usMj2V or your own Amazon.

If you don’t have a kindle, search for ‘Amazon Kindle app’ for a nifty free app so you can read it on your phone or PC.

This book is intended as an introduction to our form of Pureland Buddhism, Amida Shu Buddhism. It’s for anyone who wants to live a good life but is tired of endlessly trying to perfect themselves.

Pureland Buddhism takes a realistic view of our foolish natures as human beings, and offers us an alternative to the ‘do it yourself’ self-help movement. With anecdotes of temple life and instructions for simple Pureland practices, the authors introduce us to this ancient and unique tradition of Buddhism and show us how it can make a powerful difference to our everyday lives.

Covering topics such as trust, overcoming suffering, grace, being kind and self-care, the book also contains the voices of different Pureland Buddhists speaking of their own diverse experiences. This book shows us how we are all loveable just as we are, and that understanding this is the key to deep and lasting change.

“This book will not give you a do-it-by-numbers self-help, pull-yourself-up-by-your-own-effort ladder to climb. Here two good people have written a lovely book about faith and practice, which explains their own journey and many aspects of Pureland Buddhism in terms that are easy to understand. It will remind you of the love that is already there and the refuge that is already at hand. It will invite you to celebrate it and to do so in company with others similarly inspired. In doing so, it will welcome you home to a place of peace where all is completely assured. A wonderful contribution to the growth of the Buddhist community.”

– David Brazier

If you’re not a foolish being (or if you know any) please feel free to share it. If you find it helpful, that will make me & co-author Kaspalita happy. Also, we always appreciate short reviews as they do make a difference. Enjoy!

“I’ve found this beautiful book highly readable, it’s full of humanity. I wanted to learn some fundamentals of Buddhism and how to incorporate them into my life. Reading the accounts in this book have helped my own life to become more simple, more informed, more graceful…. And more forgiving and understanding of myself and others, which is quite a big deal for me, and yet the pages flowed through my fingers, the words never troubled my mind, I felt warm, inspired and encouraged by this book and my experience of living is richer for it. I’ll be visiting this book again.” Valerie

Listen now: Compassion and the Five Spiritual Laws

Amitabha ThangkaLast Saturday I gave a talk called The Transformative Power of Compassion. I’d been reading about the five spiritual laws, a presentation of the five niyamas, and ended up using that model of the universe as context for talking about compassion and other Buddhist virtues. It might sound complicated, but I really like the model and find it helpful in my spiritual practice. I made a little handout for the talk, which I’ve copied below. Do listen to the talk though, the handout might not make much sense otherwise 🙂

After the talk we had a wonderful discussion on topics such as the fetters, and if it’s really possible to help someone. You can listen to both below.

 

Compassion and the Five Spiritual Laws

The five spiritual laws are an interpretation of the five niyamas, passed down to Dharmavidya by Kennett Roshi.

UTU NIYAMA: (non-living matter) The universe is not answerable to my personal will

BIJA NIYAMA: (living matter) Dependent origination

KAMMA NIYAMA: Karma is inexorable

DHAMMA NIYAMA:  Good ultimately prevails

CITTA NIYAMA: (Heart/Mind) Longing springs eternal

 

In Buddhism compassion is most closely associated with Karuna which is the wish for the well-being of others. Karuna is one of the four  divine abidings or four immeasurables, therefore it is outside of normal human calculation and unlimited (divine and immeasurable) .

Acting on Karuna, for the sake of others, has lots of benefits.

The giver and the recipient both receive something spiritual, as well as whatever material support is offered.

There is a reduction of selfishness, or when we find that we are unable to act on karuna, we are shown our selfishness, which is an opportunity for fellow-feeling and tenderness to arise, particularly when we realise that despite our failure we are still in receipt of the Buddha’s wish for our happiness, and nyorai’s blessing.

 

Listen to other teachings from Amida Mandala here: Audio Teachings